Tucson

Tucson is the largest city in the southern Arizona region, one of the oldest continually inhabited places in North America. This area has been settled for at least 10,000 years.

Before Europeans first arrived here in the late 1600s, Hohokam Indians had lived along the Santa Cruz and Rillito rivers near the base of Sentinel Peak, commonly known as "A" Mountain, from about A.D. 300 to 1500. This area is widely recognized as Tucson's birthplace. When the Spanish Jesuit missionary Father Eusebio Kino first visited this area in the early 1690s, he was met here by the Tohono O'odham, or "Desert People," who were peacefully living, foraging and farming.

Spanish explorers founded the Presidio San Agustin de Tucson here on August 20, 1775, the official birthdate of the City of Tucson. The adobe-walled presidio in Tucson marked the northwestern edge of Spain's Mexican colony and housed a community of soldiers and their families for more than 80 years. A reconstructed model of the northeast corner of the original fortress is open in downtown Tucson with living history demonstrations and hands-on activities for all ages.

By 1800, there were enough civilian colonists in Tucson to begin calling the place the Pueblo de Tucson. Historian Jim Turner says the word pueblo usually refers to a nation or group of people, but in the Southwest idiom it refers to a village; Tucson’s nickname, “the Old Pueblo," is derived from this Tucson, a mid-sized Mexican village. As Tucson grew beyond the presidio walls, the population was relatively evenly split between Native American, Mexican and American residents, and cultural traditions from each of these groups were adapted and shared freely. During this time, the Pascua Yaqui people of Sonora, Mexico began settling in the Tucson area. 

Tucson officially became part of the United States in 1854 after the Gadsden Purchase. In 1877, the city was incorporated, making Tucson the oldest incorporated city in Arizona. In 1880, Tucson began a period of many changes with the arrival of the Southern-Pacific Railroad, the end of American Indian Wars, and the opening of the mines.

Tucson is famous for its dramatic beauty.   If you feel like you are coming home whenever you see mountain ranges, you’ll be immediately taken in by Tucson. In fact, you’ll be quite literally “surrounded” by five minor ranges of mountains: the Santa Catalina Mountains and the Tortolita Mountains to the north, the Santa Rita Mountains to the south, the Rincon Mountains to the east, and the Tucson Mountains to the west.

There are food deserts, those urban neighborhoods where finding healthful food is nearly impossible, and then there is Tucson.

When the rain comes down hard on a hot summer afternoon here, locals start acting like Cindy Lou Who on Christmas morning. They turn their faces to the sky and celebrate with prickly pear margaritas. When you get only 12 inches of rain a year, every drop matters.

Coaxing a vibrant food culture from this land of heat and cactuses an hour’s drive north of the Mexican border seems an exhausting and impossible quest. But it’s never a good idea to underestimate a desert rat. Tucson, it turns out, is a muscular food town.

Tucson

First slide
Pending Sale
$696,595

3 bds 2,813 Sqft
3 ba 0.69 Acres

1293 W Placita La Greda, Tucson, AZ, 85755
Courtesy of United Real Estate Southern Arizona
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$499,000

4 bds 1,667 Sqft
3 ba 0.56 Acres

848 W Camino Del Oro, Tucson, AZ, 85704
Courtesy of United Real Estate Southern Arizona
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$450,000

3 bds 2,493 Sqft
2 ba 1.00 Acres

6020 W Potvin Lane, Tucson, AZ, 85742
Courtesy of United Real Estate Southern Arizona
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$399,900

4 bds 2,767 Sqft
3 ba 0.19 Acres

11272 N Chynna Rose Place, Tucson, AZ, 85737
Courtesy of United Real Estate Southern Arizona
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$390,000

3 bds 2,028 Sqft
2 ba 0.49 Acres

4930 S Sunset Boulevard, Tucson, AZ, 85757
Courtesy of United Real Estate Southern Arizona
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$330,000

2 bds 1,221 Sqft
1 ba 2.24 Acres

4820 W Massingale Road, Tucson, AZ, 85741
Courtesy of United Real Estate Southern Arizona